Summary covering Chapter 4 of Get That Grant Book  by Weisblat

Download and Follow Along!

If you are a teacher or someone looking to write an education grant, download the “Get That Grant Book by Gina Weisblat”.  Follow along with our Grant series blogs for an abridged version of the book.  The purpose of these blogs is to assist you with writing a compelling grant to receive funding for your educational program.

 

 

As we have discussed in the earlier posts, being precise about every aspect of this grant writing process is vital in receiving the funding you are seeking. So for this has included the actual structure and strategies of the proposal, giving detailed answers to the questions (who, what, when, where, why, and how), and networking. However, if you haven’t already done this, or you are experiencing difficulties formulating the other parts, this is probably due to lack of brainstorming.

Brainstorming is a process of formulating thoughts and solutions for your perceptive problem. The program you are creating has to fulfill the needs of an issue. As soon as a problem is addressed, brainstorming should immediately occur. This is where all of the participants in the program seek for the cause of the problem and how to reverse it. The participants include but are not limited to the leaders, community, partners, and organizers. While brainstorming, having multiple ideas is wise because there can be more than one answer or cause of the problem. The process can be done formally in a scheduled meeting setting. It can also take place in an informal setting, at various times in passing, or over lunch with separate individuals. Informal settings usually occur when parties discuss the program during free time or unplanned encounters. Despite the type of brainstorming setting, the purpose is to finally bring all of the ideas together to create a solid vision and goals.

Realizing the vision, goals, and objectives is step four for structuring the proposal.

 The vision is the overall, long-term realization of the program.

The goals are the general measurable achievements of the program.

The objectives are detailed strategies for reaching the measurable goals.

The vision, goals, and objectives can be viewed as “flushing out” the solution. As ideas are brainstormed and you develop your cocktail conversation, which has been discussed in a previous post, consider the vision of the program.

 

 

Reference

Author, Weisblat (2006). Get the Grant Book [https://www.dropbox.com/s/wq4ms0zs6fj5g9b/get_that_grant_book_by_weisblat.pdf?dl=0&oref=e](pp. 15-22). Location: LRP Publications

Download the Book here:

Download and Follow Along!

If you are a teacher or someone looking to write an education grant, download the “Get That Grant Book by Gina Weisblat”.  Follow along with our Grant series blogs for an abridged version of the book.  The purpose of these blogs is to assist you with writing a compelling grant to receive funding for your educational program.

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