Summary covering Chapter 2 of Get That Grant Book  by Weisblat

Download and Follow Along!

If you are a teacher or someone looking to write an education grant, download the “Get That Grant Book by Gina Weisblat”.  Follow along with our Grant series blogs for an abridged version of the book.  The purpose of these blogs is to assist you with writing a compelling grant to receive funding for your educational program.

 

 

How happy would you be if you received a five-page document that does not answer your question or explain what is was about? Well, this is how the funding agency feels when your proposal does not provide the requested information. When writing a grant remember to answer and keep in mind the six keywords taught in grade school: who, what when, where, why, and how. Address and analyze every possible question before it’s asked.

The “who” are all the players that play a role and their responsibilities. This begins with the individual/ organization in charge of the program. The individuals whom this program is primarily intended for is another major player that must not be overlooked. Keep in mind any partners and their roles, which are also credible players in your program. Other participants in your program may be addressed through the following question and more. Who is responsible for the individual components? Who will handle problems when they arise? Who will support the program? Who else has done a similar program?

The “what” is the details for planning your program. Communicating what the current problem is and the potential values of this program. Knowing what the chain-of-command and protocols are is extremely valuable. What are the potential problems that can arise? Should be covered and evaluated? Finally, an often-missed “what” question is: what is the next process after the conclusion of your program?

The “when” is the schedule for every stage of the program. Start with when your program will or has gone into effect. Then address when will the program come to a conclusion. Describe the time frame for which the funding will be used. Also, evaluate when results are expected to show a return on investment. You should also analyze when to make changes to your methods if goals are failing to be met.

The “where” is the location for each stage and component of your program. State where the program will take place. Where will a secondary location be if something was to occur that made the original location unavailable? Never forget to provide where you will find the players for the program and partnered groups. Don’t limit yourself from answering additional questions, such as: Where the funding will be used? Where are other programs similar to yours? Where can this program be beneficial to other individuals?

The “why” is answered through clear goals and objectives as to what issues your program will satisfy. Each of the other answered questions needs to be followed by a “why” answer. This shows your reasoning for each decision. For example, why did you choose the location? Why did you choose the time frame? Why did you choose your audience and players? Why did you choose this program?

The “how” is simply the methods you plan to take to ensure the success of your program. Clarify how the program will operate. Convey how success will be measured and how the program will continue to stay supported.

The who, what, when, where, why, and how need to be constantly communicated throughout your entire document. The points touched upon above are an example, and should not limit the questions you should address in each category. Some of the answers may seem repetitive or obvious to you, but the more the better. It could make the difference between an accepted or rejected grant proposal.

 

 

 

Reference

Author, Weisblat (2006). Get the Grant Book [https://www.dropbox.com/s/wq4ms0zs6fj5g9b/get_that_grant_book_by_weisblat.pdf?dl=0&oref=e](pp. 1–3). Location: LRP Publications

Download the Book here:

Download and Follow Along!

If you are a teacher or someone looking to write an education grant, download the “Get That Grant Book by Gina Weisblat”.  Follow along with our Grant series blogs for an abridged version of the book.  The purpose of these blogs is to assist you with writing a compelling grant to receive funding for your educational program.

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